Female sterilisation reversal surgery, enables a woman who has previously been sterilised to conceive. The majority of women who have the procedure are able to conceive and have a healthy pregnancy.

There are many reasons, if you are reading this, why you may want to reverse your sterilization. These include changes in your relationship status or circumstances, discomfort from the sterilisation procedure or simply a change of heart. The decision to have a sterilisation reversal should be a personal one, and be made after careful consideration.

If you are considering a female sterilisation reversal, there are a few things you should know. In this blog post, we will outline what reversal surgery is, how it is performed, and what the success rates are. We will also provide some information on the risks and side effects associated with the procedure.

We hope that this blog post will give you the information you need to make an informed decision about reversal surgery. 

What is reversal surgery?

Reversal surgery is a procedure that can be performed to allow a woman who has previously had a tubal ligation or female sterilization to conceive. Sterilisation is a form of contraception and does not affect a woman’s fertility per se. It only stops the egg from meeting sperm. The surgery involves reconnecting the fallopian tubes, which were previously blocked or cut during sterilisation thus enabling the egg to pass down the tube and meet the sperm to enable the chance of pregnancy.

Is Sterilisation Reversal available on the NHS?

If you obtained your sterilisation on the NHS, then your first thought will be if it is possible to have a female sterilisation reversal on the NHS. Sadly, to get a sterilisation reversal, you need to pay via the private sector. This operation is not available on the NHS, no matter what your circumstances. You may have no idea initially about where to go but by seeking out surgeons who portray the success rates of female sterilisation reversal, then you will see how the reputations of surgeons who conduct female sterilisation reversal vary widely.

How is reversal surgery performed?

Reversal surgery can be performed laparoscopically, which means that it is done through small incisions in the abdomen. Usually though, it is via an open procedure (under a general anaesthetic) where an incision is made in the abdomen and the surgeon accesses the Fallopian tubes through this incision. Mr Dobson, the consultant gynaecologist who performs reversal of sterilisation surgery in Nottingham, removes the clips (if they are present) and the damaged part of the Fallopian tube to create a tubal anastomosis on both sides. As the sterilisation procedure often uses Filshie clips on the tubes or a cut through the tubes with a segment removed, the surgery to rejoin the tubes must involve removing the blocked or damaged part but is very much based on the sterilisation method that was used in the original operation.

What are the success rates for reversal surgery?

The success rates for reversal surgery vary depending on factors such as the type of sterilisation procedure that was originally performed, the surgeon’s experience, and the patient’s age. In general, reversal surgery is successful in 50-80% of cases. Mr Dobson has success rates on his website and indicates the chance of pregnancy success too.

What are the risks and side effects associated with reversal surgery?

As with any surgery, there are some risks and side effects associated with female sterilisation reversal surgery. These include bleeding, infection, and damage to the surrounding organs. There is also a risk of ectopic pregnancy, which is when the fertilised egg implants outside of the uterus.

In conclusion, reversal surgery is a procedure that can be performed to allow a woman who has previously been sterilised to conceive. The majority of women who have the procedure are able to conceive and have a healthy pregnancy. There are some risks and side effects associated with the procedure, but overall it is safe and effective.

If you are considering reversal surgery, we encourage you to contact us and speak with Mr Dobson about your specific case. They will be able to provide you with more information on the success rates, risks, and side effects associated with the procedure.

We hope this blog post has been helpful in providing you with information on reversal surgery. If you have any questions, please feel free to leave a comment below.